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Chablis Grand Cru AOC

The highest level of Chablis classifications. These are considered the best Chablis wines. There are 7 vineyards classified as Chablis Grands Crus and they are all planted on the high quality Kimmeridgien soils, rich in marine fossils. These wines, 100% Chardonnay, show complex mineral and smoky aromas and have a great potential for ageing. They pair perfectly with fine seafood dishes.

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CHABLIS Grand CRU BESTSELLERS

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CHABLIS GRAND CRU

TASTING NOTES

white wine

WHITE WINE

Appearance: The colour is discreet, brilliant and limpid. Light gold, often tending towards pale yellow, with emerald highlights.

Nose: Aromas of white fruit, peach, apricot and apple mingle with those of lime blossom and acacia. Very fresh, the mineral notes stand out.

Palate: Dry, lively and light, roundness and distinction are the common features of all the Grands Crus in the appellation. Incisive yet generous, these wines have a fine, lingering finish that is best reserved for gourmet dishes. The palate is fine, light and crystalline, with a lovely acidic backbone. The whole remains mineral and iodised, characteristic of the Chablis vineyards. The finish is persistent, with a fine balance between richness and freshness.

Ageing potential: 5 to 10 years.

Service: Serve chilled, around 8°C as an aperitif and 10°C with a meal.


FOOD AND WINE PAIRING

white wine

WHITE WINE: These wines are the ideal companion for poultry, but their strong iodine flavour makes them ideal with seafood, mussels, oysters, grilled or raw prawns and fish tartars. Fried dishes with a tangy accompaniment also go well with these gourmet white wines. Their strong minerality will enhance sushi or fatty, buttery dishes such as pasta carbonara or a puff pastry or quiche. It's a real treat with goat's cheese, gouda or comté.


MORE INFORMATION

A UNIQUE TERROIR

SOIL

It is the unique terroir of Chablis that gives it its characteristics. The soil is a sedimentary basin with a Kimmeridgian subsoil dating from the Jurassic period. The subsoil is made up of grey marl alternating with banks of limestone rich in fossils (small oyster shells). The subsoil is a real seabed. As a result, the deep roots give the wine an iodised character. It is from this subsoil that Chablis wines draw their distinctive character, finesse and distinctive minerality.

CLIMATE

The geographical position of the Chablis region means that it is subject to cold temperatures, particularly in spring, when the vine buds are very fragile. With climate change, spring frosts are becoming increasingly frequent. When the temperature drops below zero degrees Celsius, the situation becomes critical for the bud. It falls off. The vine can regenerate without worry and create other buds, but the fruit will be missing. In a single night of frost, the vineyard can lose up to 50% of its production. Over time, winegrowers have had to learn how to deal with these climatic accidents. The first heaters were introduced in 1959. They took the form of large candles that winegrowers took out in spring and lit in the vineyards to warm the soil and the atmosphere on the coldest nights.

ASPERSION:
THE FROST PROTECTION TECHNIQUE

Aspersion is a technique developed by winegrowers to protect their vines from the frost. This technique involves using water sprinklers to protect budding wines from frost by forming a protective barrier of ice around the young vine buds. This technique prevents the bud from falling at sub-zero temperatures.

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